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INSIDE STORY
Evidence or speculation?
Nasrallah revealed what he called evidence of Israel's involvement in the Hariri murder.
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2010 10:06 GMT

Hassan Nasrallah, the leader of Hezbollah, has given what he called evidence implicating Israel in the assassination of Rafiq al-Hariri, the late Lebanese prime minister.

In a televised speech, Nasrallah said Israel was trying to promote political instability inside the country with the killing of Hariri. The Hezbollah leader added that this was part of a plot that goes back as far as the early 1990s.

In the speech, Nasrallah showed footage allegedly intercepted from Israeli surveillance planes, saying Israel stalked out Hariri's routes. The video clips and aerial images revealed the site of Hariri's murder taken before the 2005 assassination took place.
 
But has Nasrallah convinced anyone at all?
 
Inside Story, with presenter Hazem Sika, discusses with Elias Hanna, a retired Lebanese army general, Rami Khouri, the director of the Issam Fares Institute at the American University of Beirut, and Jed Odermatt, the co-editor of the Hague Justice Portal.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Tuesday, August 10, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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