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INSIDE STORY
The legacy of World Cup 2010
Inside Story asks how it will benefit South Africa in the weeks, months and years to come.
Last Modified: 12 Jul 2010 12:40 GMT

So, World Cup 2010 comes to an end.

Many had questioned South Africa's ability to host and fund the games. Some were concerned fans would be deterred by high travel costs and South Africa's infamous crime rates. Fifa has said that the ticket sales had not gone as well as they had hoped.

But now it is being hailed a success by many around the world, including the likes of Sepp Blatter, the Fifa president, and Jacob Zuma, the South African president.
 
But how will it benefit South Africa in the weeks, months and years to come? Will the poor reap any dividends? Will this nation of many parts become more united? What is the legacy of South Africa 2010?
 
Inside Story, with presenter Nick Clark, discusses with guests: David Owen, a chief columnist for the Inside World Football website; Rich Mkhondo, the chief communications officer for the 2010 World Cup; and Diappolo Pheko, a policy analyst at the Trade Collective.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Sunday, July 11, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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