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INSIDE STORY
Bhopal: Too little, too late?
We ask what the verdict means for the victims of the world's worst industrial disaster.
Last Modified: 08 Jun 2010 09:40 GMT



It has taken more than 25 years for an Indian court to convict those responsible for the world's worst industrial accident.

In 1984, a gas leak from a Union Carbide plant in Bhopal killed up to 25,000 people.

Seven former company executives have now been sentenced to two years in prison for causing death due to negligence, but the men are already out on bail.

So what does this verdict mean for the victims and their families? And can it make any difference so many years after the incident?

Presenter Hazem Sika is joined by: Satish Jacob, one of the journalists that covered the Bhopal disaster in 1984; Murari Lal, a former police superintendent who supervised the Union Carbide investigation; Tim Edwards, a spokesman for the International Campaign for Justice in Bhopal.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Monday, June 7, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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