[QODLink]
Inside Story
Inside Story: The Russian spy case
How will the largest spy ring bust since the cold war affect US-Russian relations?
Last Modified: 01 Jul 2010 19:36 GMT

US authorities said on Monday they had charged 11 people with crimes including conspiracy to act as unlawful agents of Russia and money laundering.

In an operation that apparently started back in the 90's, a group of Russian undercover agents embedded themselves deep into the American society. 
 
Some lived in the fast hip cities, while others dwelled quietly in the suburbs. Some even became naturalised US citizens.
 
In a country of immigrants, they went unnoticed but now they are the talk of the US and the headlines of Russia. 

Moscow says they were not acting against US interests but how will the arrests affect relations between the two world former foes? And with no espionage charges made, what is the defining line between information gathering and spying?  

Joining the programme are Evan Perez, a journalist from the Wall Street Journal, Sergey Strokan, a political analyst and commentator, and Oleg Kalugin, a former KGB-agent, from the Centre for Counterintelligence and Security Studies (CI centre).

This episode of Inside Story aired from Wednesday, June 30, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.