[QODLink]
Inside Story
Is Obama using the BP oil crisis?
We look at the oil spill and the US president's push for a new energy legislation.
Last Modified: 17 Jun 2010 13:11 GMT

 

Barack Obama, the US president, vowed to make BP pay for, what he called, its recklessness.

It is more than eight weeks since a BP oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, and millions of gallons of oil have been spewing into the sea.

Obama said BP will have to bear the brunt for the massive damage it has caused to the environment, people and businesses.

The US president used strong words in his speech on Tuesday but many Americans are not convinced that Obama is handling the crisis in the right way.

That comes as he is pushing for a new legislation on energy.
 
Is he using the crisis for political purposes? And is he handling the crisis correctly?

Inside Story, with presenter Hoda Abdelhamid, discusses with Toby Chaudhuri, a Democrat strategist and former deputy press secretary for vice president Al Gore, Kate Sheppard, an environmental reporter and blogger who is following this oil spill very closely, and Mark Guarino, a journalist at the Christian Science Monitor.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Wednesday, June 16, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.