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INSIDE STORY
Iran's nuclear deal
Is Tehran sincere about its commitments, or is the deal a ploy to escape further sanctions?
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2010 08:45 GMT

Iran has agreed to a nuclear fuel swap - a deal that will require Tehran to send a portion of its uranium abroad in exchange for 20 per cent enriched nuclear fuel.

The agreement, brokered by Turkey and Brazil, has been met with mixed reactions. While China welcomed it, others including the US and France expressed serious reservations.

Iran has agreed to ship 1,200kg of its stockpiled low-enriched uranium to Turkey. Turkey will store the material, though it will still belong to Iran.

In exchange, Iran will get 120kg of nuclear fuel within a year. This will be delivered by the Vienna group, the US, Russia, France and the IAEA.

Iran says this will be used in a research reactor for its medical facilities. If Iran does not get its fuel within a year, it can get its uranium back from Turkey swiftly and unconditionally.
 
So, has Iran managed to split the international community? And is it an attempt to stave off further sanctions?
 
Inside Story, with presenter Shiulie Gosh, discusses with guests Sadegh Zibakalam, a political commentator and professor at Tehran University, Haldun Solmazturk, a retired army general and political analyst, and Patrick Clawson, the deputy director for research at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Tuesday, May 18, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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