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INSIDE STORY
A new leader for the Philippines
But can Benigno Aquino deliver the change his country needs?
Last Modified: 13 May 2010 10:55 GMT

After nine years of Gloria Arroyo, the Philipines is gearing up for a new president.

Millions queued to cast ballots on Monday, but the voting was marred by delay, political violence and chaos as the country implemented new automated vote-counting machines - the first of its kind in Asia.

Benigno Aquino, known as Noynoy, is set to take power from Gloria Arroyo, the outgoing president.

He is no stranger to politics.

His parents were influential political figures, committed to the principles of democracy.

Noynoy has a degree in economics and has worked in various businesses. He made his debut in politics in 1998. But some say his political achievements leave a lot to desire.

So, can Benigno Aquino deliver the change his people desperately need?

Inside Story, with presenter Hazem Sika, discusses with guests: Tobias Rettig, an assistant professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the Singapore Management University; Gene Alcantara, a Filipino journalist and co-founder of onefilipinovote.org; and Marites Vitug, the editor-in-chief of Newsbreak, an online news service.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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