[QODLink]
Inside Story
Behind Kyrgyzstan's unrest
Inside Story examines how the violent protests could impact the region.
Last Modified: 10 Apr 2010 09:14 GMT



Anger over rampant corruption and hikes in utility rates turned into violent protests in Kyrgyzstan on Wednesday, forcing Kurmanbek Bakiyev, the country's president, to flee the capital, Bishkek, for the south of the country.

The demonstrations resemble the events of 2005, which became known as the Tulip revolution, and which forced Askar Akayev, the country's former president, to step down.
 
The Central Asian country is one of the poorest in the region, but it is strategically important.

The US has a military base in Bishkek which serves as a critical supply route for the US and its allies in Afghanistan. The Russians also have an air base just 40km away from the US base. So what happens in Kyrgyzstan is a matter of concern for both countries.

So, just what is behind the latest unrest, could it spill over into neighbouring countries and are foreign hands involved?

Inside Story, with presenter Imran Garda, discusses with guests Kumar Bekbolotov, the director of the Soros Foundation in Kyrgyzstan, Aleksandr Pikaev, a defence analyst and advisor to the defence committee at the state Duma, and Evan Feigenbaum, a former deputy assistant secretary of state for South Asia and Central Asia.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Thursday, April 8, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.