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INSIDE STORY
How divided is South Africa?
The killing of a white far-right leader has raised fears of racial strains.
Last Modified: 06 Apr 2010 11:50 GMT

The killing of Eugene Terreblanche, a far-right white South African leader, has raised fears of racial strains 16 years after the end of apartheid.

Police said Terreblanche was attacked at his farm outside the town of Ventersdorp and that they have detained two workers in connection with his death.

The killing is believed to have come after a dispute over wages. Members of Terreblanche's Afrikaner Resistance Movement (AWB), however, see a deeper racial and political motive following controversy over the singing of an apartheid-era song, which includes the lyrics "kill the Boer", at public gatherings by Julius Malema, the leader of the ruling ANC's Youth League.

How divided is South Africa and with deep social and economic injustice, can the wounds of the past ever be healed?

Joining the programme are guests Pat Craven, the spokesman for the Congress of South African Trade Unions, Andre Visagie, the secretary-general of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement, and Lebohang Pheko, a policy analyst at Trade Collective, which is an NGO focusing on social development policies.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Monday, April 5, 2010. 

Source:
Al Jazeera
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