[QODLink]
INSIDE STORY
Russia's growing influence
It may be redefining itself, but is its image as a world power a myth or reality?
Last Modified: 14 Apr 2010 09:21 GMT

Since the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia has struggled to redefine itself on the world stage.

But today, it appears much bolder, more confident and ready to exert its authority.

In the past week Russia was the first country to recognise the self-proclaimed government of Kyrgyzstan, which claims it will even get financial support from Moscow.

And, even in this time of grief for Poland, following the plane crash that killed the president and dozens of political, military and religious leaders, there are signs of reconciliation with Russia.

Relations with the Ukraine have also warmed following the election of the pro-Russian president, Viktor Yanuckovich in February.

So, what is the Russian sphere of influence and how does this affect the rest of the world? And how much of Russia's image as a world power is myth, and how much reality?

Inside Story, with presenter Hamish McDonald, discusses with guests: Dmitri Babich, a political analyst with Russia Profile magazine; Alexander Nekrassov, a former advisor to President Boris Yeltsin; and Fred Weir, the Christian Science Monitor's correspondent in Russia.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Tuesday, April 13, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps have been released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.