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INSIDE STORY
Iran's latest nuclear offer
Is it a genuine effort to unlock the stand-off with the West, or is Tehran just buying time?
Last Modified: 05 Feb 2010 13:45 GMT



Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iranian president, indicates that he is willing to accept a deal offered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

The deal was put together last year in October by the US, the UK, Russia, China, France and Germany. 

It requires Iran to send about 70 per cent of its low-enriched uranium to Russia and France, where it would be processed into fuel for a research reactor.
 
The US and its allies fear Iran is trying to develop nuclear weapons. The deal would pretty much prevent them from doing so. But Iran insists its nuclear programme is entirely peaceful.

For months, Ahmadinejad criticised the deal and tried to re-negotiate the terms. That was rejected by the West. Now, Tehran says it is happy to follow certain proposals over its nuclear programme.

So, is Tehran seeking real compromise on this issue? Or is it just buying time? And how will the Western powers react?
 
Inside Story, with presenter Nick Clark, discusses with guests Seyed Mohammad Marandi, the head of North American Studies at Tehran University, Patrick Clawson, the deputy director for research at the Washington Institute, where he also directs the Iran Security Initiative, and Pavel Felgenhauer, an independent defence analyst and columnist. 

This edition of Inside Story aired from Thursday, February 4, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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