[QODLink]
INSIDE STORY
Russia's Iran dilemma
Will Moscow yield to Israeli demands to impose sanctions on Iran?
Last Modified: 17 Feb 2010 15:32 GMT



Binyamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, is in Moscow hoping to push Russia to impose crippling sanctions on Iran, and prevent delivery of an advanced air defence system to Tehran.

Netanyahu won assurances that Russia will 'hold off' on supplying Iran with advanced S-300 air defence missiles, but it is still unlikely Russia will back sanctions against Iran.

Is it in Russia's best interest to yield to Israeli demands? What can Moscow get in return, and could the Kremlin afford souring relations with neighbouring Iran? What is at stake for Moscow?

Inside Story discusses with guests: Aleksandr Pikaev, a political analyst from the Institute for World Economy and International Relations, Raanan Gissin, an analyst specialising in the Arab-Israeli conflict and a former senior adviser to Ariel Sharon, and Richard Weitz, the director of the centre for political-military analysis at Hudson Institute.

This edition of Inside Story aired from Tuesday, February 16, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.