[QODLink]
INSIDE STORY
The battle for Jerusalem
Can the EU play a role in the Israeli-Palestinian 'peace process'?
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2009 08:19 GMT

EU foreign ministers are hoping Europe can "forge a high-profile role" in resolving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.
 
Twenty-seven foreign ministers are meeting in Brussels this week to discuss a Swedish proposal to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of both Israel and Palestine, the future of the region and how Europe can aid the 'peace process'.
 
Last week, the EU issued a previously classified report on Jerusalem. 

It accuses the Israeli government of working deliberately to change the city's demographic balance by issuing Palestinians with substantially fewer building permits than they require.
 
An Israeli human rights group has said that over 4,500 Arabs had their residency rights removed last year alone - that is about half of the total number since Israel occupied East Jerusalem in 1967.

Can the EU play a role in peace making after being marginalised for so long? Or is the battle for Jerusalem already over?

Presenter Sohail Rahman is joined by Mordechai Kedar, a professor of Arabic at Bar Ilan University, Israel, Ali Abunimah, the co-founder of Electronic Intifada, an independent online publication about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and author of One Country: A Bold Proposal to Solve the Israeli-Palestinian Impasse, and Ian Black, the Guardian newspaper's Middle East editor.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Sunday, December 6, 2009.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps have been released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.