[QODLink]
INSIDE STORY
Somalia's discord and divisions
Is Somalia's fragile government under threat yet again?
Last Modified: 19 May 2009 11:16 GMT

The crisis in Somalia continues as anti-government fighters have captured key towns and villages.

Fighting has killed around 70 people in Mogadishu in the last few days alone. And members of the al-Shabab group took the town of Jowhar on Sunday. 
 
Jowhar is about 90km from Mogadishu and was chosen as the temporary location for Somalia's transitional government in 2005.

Witnesses said the al-Shabab fighters attacked the town from two fronts, killing several civilians.
 
Jowhar is seen as one of the last strongholds of the Somali government. It now controls little more than the centre of the country's capital with the support of African Union troops.

Just who exactly are the players this time around and what do they want as their country spirals into seemingly endless discord and division?
 
Inside Story
, with presenter Imran Garda, discusses.

This episode of Inside Story aired on Monday, May 18, 2009.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Despite 14-year struggle for a new mosque in the second-largest city, new roadblocks are erected at every turn.
Authorities and demonstrators have shown no inclination to yield despite growing economic damage and protest pressure.
Lebanese-born Rula Ghani may take cues from the modernising Queen Soraya, but she'll have to proceed with caution.
One of the world's last hunter-gatherer tribes has been forced from the forest it called home by a major dam project.
Chinese authorities scramble to cut off information on Hong Kong protests from reaching the mainland.