[QODLink]
Inside Story
Jihad leader calls for 'revisions'
Sayyed Imam argues for an end to militant operations and the killing of civilians.
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2007 08:20 GMT
Inside Story asks if the calling will have an impact on
 al-Qaeda [AFP]
 
Jailed Egyptian Jihad group leader, Sayyed Imam, has released Revisions, a new book calling for an end to militant operations and the killing of civilians.
 
Imam is currently imprisoned in Cairo. He was the founder and first commander of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad organisation, whose supporters assassinated Anwar Sadat, the late Egyptian president, in 1981 and later worked with Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan in the war against the Soviet occupation.
 
So, what is the significance of this move?
 
What will the fallout be for Jihad followers worldwide?
 
What impact will this have on al-Qaeda?
 
Watch this episode of Inside Story here:
 
Part 1:
 
Part 2:
 
Find out on Inside Story at 1730 GMT.
This episode of Inside Story aired on Tuesday, November 20, 2007


To contact us click on 'Send your feedback' at the top of the page

Watch Al Jazeera English programmes on YouTube

Join our debates on the Your Views page

Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Frustration grows in Kiev as pledges to end corruption and abuse of power stagnate after Maidan Square protest.
Thousands of Houthi supporters have called for the fall of Yemen's government. But what do the Houthis really want?
New ration reductions and movement restrictions have refugees from Myanmar anxious about their future in Thailand.
US lawyers say poor translations of election materials disenfranchise Native voters.
US drones in Pakistan have killed thousands since 2004. How have leaders defended or decried these deadly planes?
join our mailing list