[QODLink]
Inside Story
Jihad leader calls for 'revisions'
Sayyed Imam argues for an end to militant operations and the killing of civilians.
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2007 08:20 GMT
Inside Story asks if the calling will have an impact on
 al-Qaeda [AFP]
 
Jailed Egyptian Jihad group leader, Sayyed Imam, has released Revisions, a new book calling for an end to militant operations and the killing of civilians.
 
Imam is currently imprisoned in Cairo. He was the founder and first commander of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad organisation, whose supporters assassinated Anwar Sadat, the late Egyptian president, in 1981 and later worked with Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan in the war against the Soviet occupation.
 
So, what is the significance of this move?
 
What will the fallout be for Jihad followers worldwide?
 
What impact will this have on al-Qaeda?
 
Watch this episode of Inside Story here:
 
Part 1:
 
Part 2:
 
Find out on Inside Story at 1730 GMT.
This episode of Inside Story aired on Tuesday, November 20, 2007


To contact us click on 'Send your feedback' at the top of the page

Watch Al Jazeera English programmes on YouTube

Join our debates on the Your Views page

Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
The group's takeover of farms in Qaraqosh, 30km from Mosul, has caused fear among residents, and a jump in food prices.
Protests and online activism in recent months have brought a resurgence of ethnic Oromo nationalism in Ethiopia.
Chemotherapy is big business, but some US doctors say it could be overused and are pushing for cheaper and better care.
Amid vote audit and horse-trading, politicians of all hues agree a compromise is needed to avoid political instability.
join our mailing list