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INSIDE IRAQ
Iraq's political deadlock
A look at the growing political assassinations in the country.
Last Modified: 23 Jul 2010 16:23 GMT



Within the last six months, two lawmakers from the al-Iraqiya List, the largest parliamentary bloc in Iraq, were assassinated by unknown gunmen. Several other members of the bloc narrowly escaped attempts on their lives. 

The victims of the attacks were vocal champions of Iraqi nationalism, who vowed to fight against Iran's influence in Iraq. While the assailants in these incidents remain unpunished, al-Iraqiya leaders believe that Iran and its proxies are directly responsible for the killings.

Experts assert that the current sectarian strife in Iraq and the prolonged political deadlock are likely to spawn more violence against those who raise the banner of Iraqi nationalism.

Inside Iraq's Jasim Azawi discusses with guests: Saleh al-Mutlaq, leader of the Iraqi National Dialogue Front, one of the largest components of the al-Iraqia coalition; and Patrick Cockburn, a Middle East correspondent who writes for The Independent newspaper in the UK. 

This episode of Inside Iraq can be seen from Friday, July 23, at the following times GMT: Friday: 1730, 2230; Saturday: 0300, 0830; Sunday: 0600, 1230; Monday: 0130.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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