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INSIDE IRAQ
Iraq parliament's first session
But three months after its elections, the country is still without a government.
Last Modified: 19 Jun 2010 14:33 GMT



Three months after its elections, Iraq is still without a government.

Tough political horse-trading is underway and party bosses are jockeying to win the coveted position of prime minister.

All parties have wrapped themselves up in Iraqi nationalism and vowed to make services, security and fighting corruption their top priorities. But polls indicate that Iraqis do not believe a word of it.

What everyone is reluctant to discuss openly and freely, however, is who Iraq's neighbours would prefer to become prime minister.

Despite denials and protestations by Iraqi politicians, the decision of who should govern Iraq is made as much in Tehran, Damascus and Washington as by Iraqi voters.

Inside Iraq discusses this with guests: Al-Sharif bin al-Hussein, from the Iraqi National Alliance, and Mustafa al-Hiti, from al-Iraqiya Coalition.

This episode of Inside Iraq aired from Friday, June 18, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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