[QODLink]
INSIDE IRAQ
Is Iraq an economic battleground?
Chinese companies have emerged as Iraq's largest investor in the oil and gas sector.
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2010 08:15 GMT

Before launching his war to topple Saddam Hussein's regime, George Bush, the former US president, promised a strong independent Iraq.

Instead the country has become a bloody battleground for regional and international forces, not to mention al-Qaeda.

Today US, Israeli, Turkish, Saudi Arabian and Syrian forces compete to shape Iraq's political landscape.

Sometimes this competition is fought with brute force and sometimes by proxy through Iraqi political parties and armed groups.

The prize is Iraq's geopolitical value as a lynchpin of Gulf stability and its huge oil reserves.

While on the economic front, US companies have all but surrendered their quest to monopolise Iraq's oil, Chinese companies have signed at least three deals in recent weeks, and have emerged as Iraq's single largest investor in the oil and gas sector.

Concerned Iraqi nationalists condemn this interference but predict that Iraqi nationalism will eventually sweep away all this meddling.

We are joined by David Pollock, a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and George Galloway, a former member of the British parliament.

This episode of Inside Iraq aired from Friday, June 11, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
The group's takeover of farms in Qaraqosh, 30km from Mosul, has caused fear among residents, and a jump in food prices.
Protests and online activism in recent months have brought a resurgence of ethnic Oromo nationalism in Ethiopia.
Chemotherapy is big business, but some US doctors say it could be overused and are pushing for cheaper and better care.
Amid vote audit and horse-trading, politicians of all hues agree a compromise is needed to avoid political instability.
join our mailing list