[QODLink]
INSIDE IRAQ
Is Iraq an economic battleground?
Chinese companies have emerged as Iraq's largest investor in the oil and gas sector.
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2010 08:15 GMT

Before launching his war to topple Saddam Hussein's regime, George Bush, the former US president, promised a strong independent Iraq.

Instead the country has become a bloody battleground for regional and international forces, not to mention al-Qaeda.

Today US, Israeli, Turkish, Saudi Arabian and Syrian forces compete to shape Iraq's political landscape.

Sometimes this competition is fought with brute force and sometimes by proxy through Iraqi political parties and armed groups.

The prize is Iraq's geopolitical value as a lynchpin of Gulf stability and its huge oil reserves.

While on the economic front, US companies have all but surrendered their quest to monopolise Iraq's oil, Chinese companies have signed at least three deals in recent weeks, and have emerged as Iraq's single largest investor in the oil and gas sector.

Concerned Iraqi nationalists condemn this interference but predict that Iraqi nationalism will eventually sweep away all this meddling.

We are joined by David Pollock, a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and George Galloway, a former member of the British parliament.

This episode of Inside Iraq aired from Friday, June 11, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.