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Inside Iraq
Iraqi national movement
We discuss the newly formed cross-sectarian alliance between Iyad Allawi and Saleh al-Mutlaq.
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2009 13:42 GMT



Iyad Allawi , the former interim prime minister and Saleh al-Mutlaq, an Iraqi politician recently announced the creation of a cross-sectarian alliance called "The Iraqi National Movement" which will compete in Iraq's upcoming general election in January next year.

This new political alliance calls for the end of regional interference in Iraq – thought to be a pointed reference to Iran. And both leaders oppose Nouri Al-Maliki, the current prime minister's policies. They say the current policies of the government have failed in every aspect.

But the two leaders of the new Iraqi National Movement alliance also have their critics. Those critics say both Allawi and Al-Mutleq have links to the deposed Ba'ath Party.

The two leaders both deny this allegation - arguing that real national reconciliation should include former Ba'athists who do not have blood on their hands.

Does this new alliance mark a departure from political sectarianism and hope for national unity? Or is it more of the same?

This episode of Inside Iraq discusses the aims and prospects of the new alliance with guests: Fareed Sabri, the director of the Iraqi Islamic party office in the UK, and Ghassan Atiyyah, the director of Iraqi Foundation for Development and Democracy.

This episode of Inside Iraq can be seen from Friday, November 6, 2009 at the following times GMT: Friday: 1730, 2230; Saturday: 0300, 0830; Sunday: 0600, 1230 and Monday: 0130.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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