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Inside Iraq
Improved democracy?
The implications of the newly passed election law on the Iraqi people.
Last Modified: 13 Nov 2009 15:50 GMT



This week the Iraqi parliament passed a crucial election law after weeks of deadlock.

In other countries, a new election law may be only an internal affair.

In Iraq, it is different. Without the new law, parliamentary elections scheduled for January could not take place and US troop withdrawal may have been postponed.

Now, elections are to be held on January 12, 2010. Just five days after the original date, but the law remains controversial.

The oil-rich city of Kirkuk in Northern Iraq is at the heart of the debate. Kurds consider Kirkuk a Kurdish city and want it to be part of their self-ruled region in northern Iraq.

Arabs and Turkmen vehemently disagree. They want control to be with the central government in Baghdad and some accuse Kurds of deliberately changing demographics in their favour.

The new law benefits the Kurdish community, but analysts say all sides had to compromise. The US President hails the law as a milestone, but what does it mean for Iraqi politics? Is it a move towards more democracy or yet another proof of sectarianism?

Inside Iraq discusses with guests Orhan Ketene, a speaker of the Turkman Front,
Mundher Adhami, an Analyst, King's College, and Firyad Rawandouzi, a Kurdish MP.

This episode of Inside Iraq can be seen from Friday, November 12, 2009 at the following times GMT: Friday: 1730, 2230; Saturday: 0300, 0830; Sunday: 0600, 1230 and Monday: 0130.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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