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Inside Iraq
The Iraqi diaspora
Iraqis living outside of their country who influence affairs inside.
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2009 13:33 GMT



Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis have fled their country in recent times.

Massive departures followed the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s, the first Gulf War in the 1990s and again in the wake of the US-led invasion of 2003.

Many of these Iraqis, seeking to escape conflict, sanctions or civil war, have kept their links with home alive by supporting charities and humanitarian organisations working inside Iraq. Some even recently became election monitors.

Inside Iraq of this week discusses the power and influence ofl the Iraqi Diaspora. Do they champion or challenge the Iraqi government? And does the Diaspora reflect the same sectarian affiliations as on the ground back home?

Jasim Azawi discusses with guests Nidhal Garmo, the CEO for Victims of War and Poverty, Raed Jarrar, Iraq consultant, American Friends Service Committee, and Houzan Mahmoud, Organisation of Women's Freedom in Iraq.

This episode of Inside Iraq can be seen from Friday, October 9, at the following times GMT: Friday: 1730, 2230; Saturday: 0300, 0830; Sunday: 0600, 1230 and Monday: 0130.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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