[QODLink]
Inside Iraq
The future of Nouri al-Maliki
How will recent violence impact his chances of electoral success?
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2009 12:48 GMT



Nouri al-Maliki, the Iraqi
prime minister, has never tired of emphasising his security achievements.

Recent calm in Iraq has given al-Maliki's new electoral coalition list a massive lead over his rivals ahead of the parliamentary elections in January next year.

But the bombings of bloody Wednesday last August in Baghdad and more recently the twin suicide bombings that killed over 150 people in Baghdad on Sunday October 25 have raised doubts about security.

How come high risk targets are still susceptible to attack? Could these bombings cost al-Maliki dearly in the January elections?

Jasim Azzawi discusses with guests: Michael Corbin, the US deputy assistant secretary of state for the bureau of near Eastern affairs, and Mithal al-Alusi, the head of the Iraqi Nation Party.

This episode of Inside Iraq can be seen from Friday, October 30, 2009 at the following times GMT: Friday: 1730, 2230; Saturday: 0300, 0830; Sunday: 0600, 1230 and Monday: 0130.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Russia is expected to be the main topic of the two-day NATO summit this week in Wales.
In Brussels, NGO staff are being trained to fill the shortfall of field workers in West Africa.
Lawsuit by 6-year-old girl, locked up for a year, reignites debate over indefinite detention of 'boat people'.
Indonesian and Malaysian authorities are keeping a close eye on local supporters of the hard-line Middle East group.
Citizens of the tiny African nation say they're increasingly anxious of the fallout after alleged coup.
join our mailing list