[QODLink]
Inside Egypt

Can Abdel Fattah el-Sisi unite Egyptians?

A low turnout in Egypt's presidential vote makes it hard for ouster general to fix divisions within society.

Last updated: 02 Jun 2014 12:29
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Egyptians have voted this week to elect a new president but several groups of young revolutionaries say they will continue their fight against oppression, with some promising to return to Tahrir Square.

These revolutionaries have boycotted the vote, calling it a farce. They were the driving force behind the 2011 revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak.

Two years later, they threw their support behind Abdel Fattah el-Sisi as he led a coup against the democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi. But later on, they turned against him.

The Muslim Brotherhood are against the process. They want nothing but a restitution of what they call legitimacy.

The interim government rushed to designate the Brotherhood as a terrorist group, and arrested its leaders and members. Besides these two groups, there are Sisi supporters. Those include remnants of the Mubarak regime, Copts and a big chunk of the business community who also thrived under Mubarak.

So, how can Sisi bring these divided groups together? And what are the dangers if Egypt remains so polarised?

Presenter: Mike Hanna

Guests:

Mohamed El Menshawy: Egyptian journalist based in Washington.

Khalil Anani, adjunct professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University and author of The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt.

Rasha El Ibiary, a researcher specialising in political communication, as well as a professor at German University in Cairo.

221

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.
join our mailing list