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Indian Hospital Revisited

Patient: Qurathulain Khan and Baby Hatesham

Deeply jaundiced and with his liver failing, in 2012 then-nine-month-old Hatesham needed a costly transplant.

Last updated: 09 Mar 2014 11:26
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Qurr was determined to do all she could for her son, despite opposition from her immediate family [Al Jazeera]

Qurathulain and her husband Akbar are typical of India's new working class. She works in a small business, and he is a machinery salesman. Each month they bring home the equivalent of $200, which is just enough to live on but leaves no room for luxuries let alone medical emergencies.

Two years ago, their beloved first child, nine-month-old Hatesham, was seriously ill. His liver had failed, and he needed a transplant. In India, transplants, particularly paediatric transplants of this complexity, are rarely performed and cost an enormous amount of money - well beyond the means of this family.

Like any mother, Qurr was determined to do all she could for her son, despite opposition from her immediate family. Her parents were vehemently against spending any money on treating the child, and had instead advised Qurr to just have another baby.

Deeply jaundiced, Hatesham had already had two surgeries during our 2012 visit. Akbar donated part of his liver to his only son, and doctors had expected the baby to recover well. Two years after young Hatesham’s treatment began, we have returned to find out what happened to him.

Indian Hospital Revisited, a special two-part interactive addition to our original series, can be seen on March 13 and March 20, 2014, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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