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Indian Hospital Revisited

Episode one

Watch the non-interactive version of the film here.

Last updated: 18 Mar 2014 14:02
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On the outskirts of Bangalore, India's third-largest city, is a unique experiment in healthcare; a hospital with a difference that is determined to make a difference.

In 2012 we brought you the story of Narayana Hrudayalaya, an Indian hospital that aimed to give the best possible care to anybody who walked through its doors, whether they could afford tp pay or not.

Now we return to Narayana, after two years, to revisit the doctors and patients we had met, and to see what - if anything - has changed for them during this time.

To watch the special, interactive version of this film, click here

Indian Hospital Revisited, a special two-part interactive addition to our original series, can be seen on March 13 and March 20, 2014, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100

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