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Indian Hospital
Dr Ashley D'Cruz
One of only a few pediatric liver transplant surgeons worldwide, D'Cruz's role is physically and emotionally demanding.
Last Modified: 03 May 2012 16:20
Dr D'Cruz is one of only a select group of pediatric liver transplant surgeons worldwide

Dr Ashley D'Cruz, a pediatric surgeon and the director of the Liver Transplant Unit at Narayana Hrudayalaya, came from humble beginnings.

His father worked his way up in the Indian railways to become an officer and his mother was a hospital matron. Money was tight but his parents made sure he and his siblings received a good education, sending them to boarding school.

His parents' sacrifices paid off, and D'Cruz is now one of only a select group of pediatric liver transplant surgeons worldwide.

In India, liver transplants are only 10 to 15 years old and with no real culture of organ donation most must come from living donors, which complicates matters further.

It is a physically demanding profession as a typical transplant operation may take 17 or 18 hours and involves two teams and up to 20 people. And with the risk of serious complications and even mortalities weeks or months after the complex surgery, stress levels are high.

It takes a certain type of person to be able to deal daily with anxious parents, like those of nine-month-old baby Hatersham who have pinned all their hopes on a successful transplant.

And D'Cruz is exactly that type of person - calm and reassuring but absolutely honest in laying out the potential risks and dangers involved in any transplant operation.

Despite this, if things go wrong the parents are often quick to blame the surgical team.


Watch six one-hour episodes of a unique observational documentary Indian Hospital offering a rare insight into the complexities and dilemmas of modern India.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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