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The Secret Iraq Files
After the biggest leak of military secrets ever, this special programme reveals the truth about the war in Iraq.
Last Modified: 11 Dec 2011 09:41

 

It is the biggest leak of military secrets ever. Al Jazeera has obtained access to almost 400,000 classified American documents. Torture, claims of murder at the checkpoint - revelations that make a mockery of the rules of combat.

Over the past ten weeks, working with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism in London, Al Jazeera has read tens of thousands of documents, which we sourced through WikiLeaks.
 
There is a good reason that Washington did not want you to see them. They reveal the covering up of Iraqi state torture to the truth about the hundreds of civilians who have been killed at coalition road blocks.
 
The documents sourced through WikiLeaks cover six years of war. And while they mainly deal with day-to-day events they also allow us to paint a big picture. We are getting an insight into the rise of al-Qaeda in Iraq - who pays for it and how it gets its money?

We will be finding out what the Americans really think about Nouri al-Maliki, Iraq's prime minister, and we will reveal details about Iran's secret war inside Iraq, and America's massive use of air power - is it as precise as they claim?

Part two:

Source:
Al Jazeera
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