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Broken Dreams of Gaza
Charting the rise and fall of the hopes of ordinary Gazans since 2005.
Last Modified: 26 Jan 2009 14:07 GMT



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In 2005 filmmaker Mariam Shahin recorded the hopes and aspirations of both ordinary and extraordinary people living in Gaza.

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From bright young high school graduates to an antiquities dealer. From an entrepreneur who had high hopes for a prosperous future, to Gaza's only girls rowing team.

Shahin met the people who saw a glimmer of hope for Gaza in the period following the Israeli withdrawal from the Strip in 2005.
 
She returned to Gaza in 2007 and found a very different mood. The peace process had faltered, internal strife had erupted, and Israel had tightened its siege.

Finally she caught up with some of the same characters to find out how they have coped under Israel's recent war on Gaza.

Where optimism once flowered briefly, dreams have been dashed and survival is now the main concern for Gazans.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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