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AFRICA UNCOVERED
Africa Uncovered - Horror and Hope
The ethnically-mixed group of young journalists documenting life in a Nairobi slum.
Last Modified: 19 Aug 2008 13:26 GMT

Africa Uncovered follows the journalists behind Kenya's Slum TV
When rioting broke out in the wake of Kenya's disputed presidential election, Nairobi's Mathare slum experienced its share of the ethnic violence.

By the time a power-sharing agreement was signed 1,200 Kenyans had been killed and a further 300,000 made homeless.

Amidst this mayhem, an ethnically-mixed group of aspiring young journalists from Mathare decided to take up cameras instead of knives.

As well as documenting the violence, Slum TV's aim is to project some hope back into their scarred community and to capture a more positive side of Mathare life.

Africa Uncovered follows the precarious progress of the Slum TV team as they count down to a public screening and revisit some of the key characters they filmed during the violence to find out if peace is winning through or if the deadly mix of ethnic tension and social deprivation in Mathare is likely to bubble to the surface again.

Watch part one of this episode

Watch part two of this episode

This episode of Africa Uncovered airs from Monday, August 18, 2008

Source:
Al Jazeera
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