We look back at some of Sir David's landmark interviews in the the first of two special compilation programmes.

This episode of Frost Over the World focuses on world politics.

It begins with an overview from the the British prime minister, David Cameron, as he talks about the tragedy of 9/11, the so-called war on terror, the impact of the Arab Spring, the military intervention in Libya, the security situation in Afghanistan and the recognition of Palestine as a state.

Earlier in 2011, Cote d'Ivoire was gripped by a civil war as Laurent Gbagbo, who despite losing last year's election, refused to accept the result and held on to power. It was a bloody battle with over a thousand deaths, but in the end, with French help, Alassane Ouattara, the election's winner, managed to capture Gbagbo, to defeat his forces and to take control. Where does it leave such a deeply divided country?

Alassane Ouattara, the president of Cote d'Ivoire, talks to Sir David about the situation in his divided country, the challenges he is facing as the country's leader, and his vision for the West African country.

And in October 1991, the Supreme Council of Azerbaijan declared independence from the Soviet Union. The entire Soviet state was crumbling and the former Republic became independent countries.

Azerbaijan had a rocky start because of a war with neighbouring Armenia over the disputed Ngorno Karabakh region. It cost an estimated 30,000 lives, and the two countries are still officially at war right now. But oil an gas fines have pumped huge flows of money into Azerbaijan and Baku, its capital city.

To mark the anniversary of the independence of Azerbaijan, Sir David travelled to Baku to meet Ilham Aliyev, the country's president.

The president describes how the country has changed in the past 20 years, the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan, the upcoming Eurovision song contest which will be hosted by Azerbaijan, and the country's economic development.

Source: Al Jazeera