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Frost over the World
The Middle East 'peace process'
Sir David Frost talks to Martin Indyk and Mustafa Barghouti about negotiations, Jewish settlements and hopes for peace.
Last Modified: 03 Oct 2010 07:48 GMT
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Mikheil Saakashvili

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Wyclef Jean

Former Fugees singer Wyclef Jean was so moved by the devastation caused by the earthquake in Haiti that he decided to run for the presidency of the country. He explains why he has now given up his candidacy.

Martin Indyk & Mustafa Barghouti

As Middle East peace talks resume after almost two years of stalemate, Martin Indyk, the former US ambassador to Israel, talks about whether Binyamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, will make peace with the Palestinians.

Plus, Mustafa Barghouti, the former Palestinian presidential candidate, discusses the impact of continued settlement building on the negotiations and explains why he thinks that the world has become addicted to the 'peace process'.



This episode of Frost over the World aired from Friday, September 24, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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