[QODLink]
FROST OVER THE WORLD
Craig Venter on artificial life
The geneticist talks about what his breakthrough means for science and ethics.
Last Modified: 30 May 2010 09:44 GMT
Craig Venter, left, and his research partner, Hamilton Smith, transplanted synthetic DNA
into living bacterial cells [EPA]

On this episode of Frost over the World: Craig Venter joins the show to discuss the implications for science and ethics of the creation of artificial life; a look at the crisis building between North and South Korea; and paralympic athlete Oscar Pistorius.

This episode aired from Friday, May 28, 2010.

Craig Venter



Craig Venter has created artificial life. Last week, the geneticist announced that he and his research partner, the Nobel Laureate Hamilton Smith, had successfully transplanted synthetic DNA into living bacterial cells.

He joins Sir David from New York to discuss his startling breakthrough and its implications for both science and ethics.

Chun Yung-woo & Richard McGregor



Chun Yung-woo, the South Korean vice minister for foreign affairs and trade, joins Sir David from Seoul to discuss the crisis building between North and South Korea following the sinking of the South Korean warship, Cheonan.

Plus, Financial Times reporter, Richard McGregor, joins Sir David to talk about his new book, The Secret World of China's Communist Rulers, which investigates the mysterious power behind the scenes of this emerging global superpower.

General Jack Keane



The former vice chief of staff of the US army joins Sir David to talk about the Iraq war and US foreign policy.

Oscar Pistorious



Paralympic athlete, Oscar Pistorius, joins Sir David from the Paralympic World Cup in Manchester. He talks about his recent victory in the 400m and his hopes to compete alongside able-bodied athletes at the 2012 Olympic Games in London.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.