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FROST OVER THE WORLD
The aftermath of civil war
Sri Lanka's civil war ended four months ago but nearly 300,000 people remain in IDP camps.
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2009 13:54 GMT

Many of those displaced by the fighting remain in government-run camps [GALLO/GETTY]

This week Sir David talks to Rajiva Wijesinha, Sri Lanka's permanent secretary to the ministry of disaster management and human rights, about the aftermath of the country's 25-year civil war, and to Iranian authors, Azar Nafisi and Hooman Majd, about Iran's relations with the West.

This episode of Frost over the World aired from Friday, September 11, 2009. 

Rajiva Wijesinha

 

After 25 years of fighting and more than 80,000 casualties, Sri Lanka's civil war came to an end four months ago. However, there are still nearly 300,000 displaced people languishing in government-run camps and stories of maltreatment and malnutrition are rife.

But neither the UN nor independent journalists have yet been granted free access to the camps to either confirm or deny the stories.

Rajiva Wijesinha, the permanent secretary to the ministry of disaster management and human rights, discusses this.

Emma Bonino, Hooman Majd and Nazar Nafisi

 

A report published earlier this week has said that some European leaders are trying to prevent Turkey gaining full EU membership.

Emma Bonino, a former European commissioner and a vice president of the Italian senate, joins the show to discuss this.

Plus, Sir David asks Iranian authors Azar Nafisi and Hooman Majd what the Iranian people think of their country's nuclear programme and outspoken president.

Heston Blumenthal

 

Chef Heston Blumenthal has been described as a modern-day Willy Wonka for his experimental cooking.

His restaurant, The Fat Duck, has three Michelin stars and has just been awarded a perfect 10 by the Good Food Guide.

It was also declared the Best Restaurant in the World in 2005. He joins Sir David.

Richard Dawkins and Richard Kemp

 

Scientist and atheist Richard Dawkins had a worldwide bestseller a couple of years ago with his book The God Delusion.

Now he is back with a new book, The Greatest Show on Earth, which insists that Evolution is an unarguable certainty to explain life on earth.

Colonel Richard Kemp, the former commander of the British forces in Afghanistan, has written a book called Attack State Red about the military campaign in the country. He joins Sir David to discuss it.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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