[QODLink]
Al Jazeera Frames
500,000 Euros
Pathological gamblers talk through their addictions in casinos and racetracks, immersing us in their irrational world.
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2011 12:44

Filmmaker: Ivan Vania

In Lombardi, Italy, pathological gamblers talk through their addictions in casinos and racetracks, immersing us in their irrational world.

"It started as an occasional thing. After buying a coffee, I had enough to buy a two euro 'scratch and win' card. It's just so easy that you spend everything hoping to hit the 'big bang'. It's as easy as stepping inside a bar, any bar. There are slot machines. Just look at the slots and you'll understand ...."

"I don't even realise it, but I have been playing on the machines since the afternoon. That's seven hours in front of the machines and I haven't even noticed. You lose perception of time, of being human."

The voices you hear in 500,000 Euros belong to pathological gamblers interviewed during the study "Gamesick", carried out by the Addiction Department with the collaboration of Codici, a Lombardi social research agency.

 

 

Click here for more on Al Jazeera Frames.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.