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The Fabulous Picture Show
A master class with Mira Nair
The Indian-born director of Monsoon Wedding and Mississippi Masala talks to FPS.
Last Modified: 03 Dec 2009 07:55 GMT



Watch part two

Indian-born director Mira Nair has amassed a body of work so eclectic, so admired, that she has become one of the most successful female filmmakers of our time.

Her 1988 debut feature, Salaam Bombay! won the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival and was nominated for an Academy Award. 

Since then, she has worked with A-list stars in Mississippi Masala, Vanity Fair and Hysterical Blindness, and scored triumphs with international titles like Monsoon Wedding and Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love

Mira and Hillary Swank - Amelia

Nair's masterful ability to juxtapose East and West comes to light in an FPS master class special as full of surprises as the director herself.

She talks to Amanda Palmer, Al Jazeera's head of entertainment, and the FPS audience about how her film-making was born out of feeling like an outsider.

She also talks about the difference between working on Hollywood blockbusters and independent films, her views on censorship and what she found most inspiring about her latest subject, Amelia Earhart, and much more.

This episode of The Fabulous Picture Show can be seen from Thursday, December 03, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 0600, 1630; Friday: 0130, 0830; Saturday: 1130, 2330; Sunday: 0630, 2030; Monday: 1430; Tuesday: 1930; Wednesday: 0300.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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