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Fault Lines

Access restricted: abortion in Texas

Fault Lines travels to Texas to investigate why some women are taking abortion into their own hands.

Last updated: 04 May 2014 07:43
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Texas has passed some of the most restrictive anti-abortion laws in the U.S.

By September 2014, only six abortion clinics are expected to remain in a state that has 70,000 abortions per year. Fault Lines travels to Texas to find out what’s behind the legislation and how it is affecting women’s lives.

In this episode we meet a 23-year old woman named Melissa, who self-induces an abortion because she lives in an area of Texas that no longer has any abortion clinics.

She says it’s a financial burden to travel 300 miles round-trip to reach the closest abortion clinic. Instead, Melissa traveled 30 minutes to Mexico, where she bought a medication called Misoprostal. It’s normally used to treat ulcers, but she took it to end her pregnancy.

Fault Lines re-traces Melissa’s steps to Mexico, to find out how a woman in her position could acquire Misoprostal without a prescription, and speaks with advocates on both side of the debate over access to abortions in Texas.

 

Fault Lines   can be seen on Al Jazeera English each week at the following times GMT: Tuesday: 2230; Wednesday: 0930; Thursday: 0330; Friday: 1630. 

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Al Jazeera
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