[QODLink]
Fault Lines

Access restricted: abortion in Texas

Fault Lines travels to Texas to investigate why some women are taking abortion into their own hands.

Last updated: 04 May 2014 07:43
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Texas has passed some of the most restrictive anti-abortion laws in the U.S.

By September 2014, only six abortion clinics are expected to remain in a state that has 70,000 abortions per year. Fault Lines travels to Texas to find out what’s behind the legislation and how it is affecting women’s lives.

In this episode we meet a 23-year old woman named Melissa, who self-induces an abortion because she lives in an area of Texas that no longer has any abortion clinics.

She says it’s a financial burden to travel 300 miles round-trip to reach the closest abortion clinic. Instead, Melissa traveled 30 minutes to Mexico, where she bought a medication called Misoprostal. It’s normally used to treat ulcers, but she took it to end her pregnancy.

Fault Lines re-traces Melissa’s steps to Mexico, to find out how a woman in her position could acquire Misoprostal without a prescription, and speaks with advocates on both side of the debate over access to abortions in Texas.

 

Fault Lines   can be seen on Al Jazeera English each week at the following times GMT: Tuesday: 2230; Wednesday: 0930; Thursday: 0330; Friday: 1630. 

Watch more   Fault Lines  

236

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.
join our mailing list