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Fault Lines
Disenfranchised in America
Fault Lines examines accusations that new voting laws are effectively disenfranchising communities of colour in the US.
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2012 07:05

New legislation across the US could have a huge impact on the country's 2012 presidential elections. Largely Republican politicians have passed a range of new voting laws that groups fear could disenfranchise as many as five million American voters this year.

Fault Lines blog

Voting in America: When is Democracy not a Democracy?

Politicians claim that they are concerned about preventing voter fraud but minority communities see the civil rights gained in the 1960s as being under attack again in a subtler way.

The department of justice has already made strong rulings against laws that have been passed in South Carolina and Texas because they discriminate against minorities.  

Fault Lines travels to Tennessee and Florida, two states that have passed strict laws, to explore the origins and consequences of the new legislation.

Who are the individuals that are at risk of not participating in the next election? What are groups doing to fight back? And could enough voters be disenfranchised in 2012 that it could have a significant impact on the outcome of the election?

 

Fault Lines can be seen on Al Jazeera English each week at the following times GMT: Tuesday: 2230; Wednesday: 0930; Thursday: 0330; Friday: 1630; Saturday: 2230; Sunday: 0930; Monday: 0330; Tuesday: 1630.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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