[QODLink]
Fault Lines
Arundhati Roy
The Indian author and political activist joins Avi Lewis on Fault Lines.
Last Modified: 29 Aug 2010 19:13 GMT

In 1997, Arundhati Roy's first novel The God of Small Things made her the first Indian woman to win the prestigious Booker Prize. More than six million copies of the book were sold worldwide.

Since then, she has turned her pen to politics. During the Bush years, she was a fierce critic, calling the invasion of Afghanistan "an act of terror on the people of the world".

In India, she has campaigned against mega dams projects, denounced the rise of Hindu nationalism, and has been imprisoned by the Supreme Court of India for "corrupting public morality".

Her latest essay describes her trip into the heart of India's Maoist insurgency, the movement, India's government has launched a major military campaign to crush.

Fault Lines caught up with Arundhati Roy during a rare US appearance.

She talks to Avi Lewis about fighting on the ground, battles over corporate control of Indian land, India and the US after the Cold War, 'Islamophobia' and terrorism, tribal resistance in India and Afghanistan, and the issues behind the so-called Maoist insurgency.

This episode of Fault Lines can be seen from Thursday, May 6, 2010 at the following times GMT: Thursday: 0600; Friday: 0030, 0830; Saturday: 2330; Sunday: 0630, 2130; Tuesday: 0530, 1230; Wednesday: 0300.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.