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Fault Lines
100 Days of Resistance
An inside look behind the power struggle in Honduras.
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2009 09:20 GMT



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It has been more than 100 days since Honduras underwent only the second coup in Central America since the end of the Cold War.
 
The crisis has been portrayed as a personal standoff between Manuel Zelaya, the president who was flown out of the country in his pajamas at gunpoint, and Roberto Micheletti, the man who was sworn into power that very same day.

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As the country moves haltingly toward elections scheduled for the end of November, Fault Lines travelled to Honduras to learn more, and found that the polarisations run deeper and wider than an easy narrative of political rivalry.
 
We ask what Honduras means for the tectonic shifts underway in Latin America, the influence of Hugo Chavez and the emerging policies of the Obama administration.
 
Honduras is a country divided by economic disparity, and members of the tiny group of families that hold the country in their powerful grip speak to Fault Lines.

Social movements are also mobilising in the streets, standing up to repression not just to bring their president back, but to re-found their nation on more equal terms.


This episode of Fault Lines aired from Thursday, October 15.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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