[QODLink]
Fault Lines
Newt Gingrich
Is the influential Republican preparing for another political revolution?
Last Modified: 11 Jul 2009 12:19 GMT



Watch part two

At 65 years old and more than a decade out of office, Newt Gingrich remains one of the most powerful figures in Washington.

In depth
155x48
 More on Fault Lines
 More Fault Lines videos
As speaker of the House, he led the Republican party from the backbenches of US politics to national prominence in the mid-1990s.

He ruthlessly attacked the Democrats on every major issue, drilling holes into the Clinton agenda while building support for his conservative brand.

Today, with the Republican party struggling to regroup after a devastating defeat in the November elections, Gingrich is once again back in the spotlight.

Fault Lines' Avi Lewis goes one-on-one with the influential Republican and asks him if, having pulled off a political revolution once before, he is gearing up to do it again?


Fault Lines can be seen from Saturday, July 11, at the following times GMT: Saturday: 1130, 2330; Sunday: 0630, 2030; Monday: 1430; Tuesday: 1230; Wednesday: 0300

Source:
Al Jazeera
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps will be released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.