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Fault Lines
Bush's torture legacy
A televised town hall meeting asks will those responsible be held accountable.
Last updated: 30 May 2009 09:47
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WATCH PART 2

As a candidate for the US presidency, Barack Obama promised a new direction.

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He acted upon those promises just days after taking office issuing a series of executive orders banning all acts of torture, discontinuing the use of CIA "black sites", and calling for the closure of the US detention centre at Guantanamo Bay.

However given the litany of new evidence revealing systematic abuse of detainees in US prisons around the world, pressure is mounting on the new administration to investigate crimes committed in the name of the so-called war on terror.

This week on Fault Lines, Josh Rushing joins a panel of experts in front of a live studio audience for a town hall debate on torture.

We will ask what it will take to dismantle the Bush administration's legacy of torture and if those responsible will be held to account.


This special edition of Fault Lines can be seen from Saturday May 30, at the following times GMT: Saturday: 1130, 2330; Sunday: 0630, 2030; Monday: 1430; Tuesday: 1230; Wednesday: 0300;

Source:
Al Jazeera
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