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Everywoman
Women on the frontline of war
From Bosnia to Lebanon, Everywoman meets women endangering their lives to help others.
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2008 12:28 GMT

Marijana Senjak helps women who were raped during
the war in Bosnia
In the last of our current series of Everywoman we meet the brave women making a difference on the frontline, women who are putting their own lives in danger to help others, women who are fighting to save lives, and fighting for reconciliation.

Marijana Senjak - Bosnia

We start with central Bosnia, where thousands of women have been left mentally and physically scarred by their treatment during the Bosnian war.

Documents suggest anywhere from 20,000 to 50,000 women were raped during the conflict, mostly by Serb men although others were involved too.

Many victims were kept in organised rape camps, and assaulted many times. Most were Muslim women who are still trying to come to terms with their horrific experiences.

One woman who devotes her time to helping them is Marijana Senjak, a trained psychologist and director of the non-governmental organisation Medica.

Everywoman met her in the town of Zenica.
 
Women de-mining - Lebanon

In Lebanon, families are still dealing with the legacy of the war between Israel and Hezbollah in the summer of 2006. Around a million cluster bombs were dropped by Israel towards the end of the war. They continue to kill or injure civilians every day.

The job of mine clearance used to be exclusively male. But now organisations are training women to find and defuse the bombs. 

Everywoman was given exclusive access  to a UN demining unit. We followed Hanan Khalil and Naamet Kasseb in their mission to make Lebanon safer. 

Nurses on the frontline - Thailand

Everywoman met two nurses who elected to
stay in the troubled south of Thailand
In Thailand, most of the country's Muslim minority are concentrated in the south, where they say they are discriminated against and oppressed by the Buddhist majority.
 
Despite a recent change in government, Southern Thailand has been the focus of escalating violence since a wave of insurgency erupted in 2004. Over 2,000 people have died, and shootings and bombings have become an almost daily occurrence. 

Despite the danger, a group of nurses have elected to stay and treat patients, risking their own lives to do so.
 
Everywoman met Aona Nong and Saleena – a Buddhist and a Muslim – two of the brave nurses of Southern Thailand.

Parents' circle - Palestine and Israel

Finally on this programme, what do you do when your loved one is killed by your bitterest enemy - fight back, seek revenge?

That is what most people would want to do, but now a group of Israelis and Palestinians have taken a different path. 

The Parents Circle is the first organisation of its kind where bereaved families from both sides of the conflict have come together to stop the violence.  

Everywoman's Mariam Shahin went to meet some of these extraordinary people.

Watch part one of this episode of Everywoman

Watch part two of this episode of Everywoman


This episode of Everywoman aired from June 27, 2008

If you have any comments, do email us at everywoman@aljazeera.net 

Source:
Al Jazeera
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