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Everywoman
Women in sport and playing for gold
We meet some aspiring female athletes as they look forward to the Olympics.
Last Modified: 30 May 2008 12:34 GMT

Siham Hilali from Morocco is a middle-distance runner
who has competed in championships across the world
The countdown is on to this year's Olympic Games in Beijing.

Marred by protests over Tibet, it is easy to lose sight of the fact that hundreds of hopefuls will be competing for their dream - an Olympic gold medal.

One of those will be  21-year-old Siham Hilali from Morocco.

Siham is a middle-distance runner who has competed in championships across the world.

Now she is one of Morocco's greatest hopes for this year's Olympics.

But not only does Siham have to contend with a tough training schedule, she is also challenging people's perception of a woman's place in Muslim society. Everywoman went to meet her.

Boxing sisters

The sisters follow Islamic teachings and dream
to reach international standards in boxing
Riham and Fatma are Israeli Arab sisters, both conservative Muslims who religiously follow Islamic teachings.

But they are also boxers, and their dream is to reach international standards in the sport.

It has caused some problems - one religious leader has decreed that women should not be allowed to fight - but their family and community are behind them.

Everywoman watched them train.

Qatari Archer

Nada Zeidan switched to archery and
represented Qatar twice at the Asian Games
Nada Zeidan was the first female rally driver from the Gulf, regularly driving to victory on circuits in Dubai, Syria and Lebanon.

Then she switched to archery, and went on to represent Qatar twice at the Asian Games.

Now she is fronting the campaign to hold the 2016 Olympics in Doha.

She says she wants to inspire sportswomen throughout the Arab world .

Everywoman went to meet her as she was preparing for the most recent Asian Games.

Egyptian football

Women are successfully playing football in
Egypt, as Everywoman found out
Men's football is always high profile. Without a doubt, many have heard of David Beckham for example - but now the Women's game is gaining recognition, particularly across the Middle East. 

Despite criticisms from conservative quarters who do not like the idea, women's football is becoming increasingly popular.

And thanks to pioneers like coach Sahar Al Hawari in Egypt, women are successfully both playing and refereeing the beautiful game, as Everywoman found out.

Watch part one this episode of Everywoman

Watch part two this episode of Everywoman

This episode of Everywoman aired on Friday, May 30, 2008


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