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Empire: The Peace Process

Daniel Kurtzer: 'It's not up to the US'

Former US ambassador to Israel discusses his own experiences in the negotiations and each party's expectations.

Last Modified: 26 Aug 2013 16:20
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It is not up to the United States to allow another mediator to step in. It is up to the parties.

Daniel Kurtzer, former US ambassador to Israel

Daniel Kurtzer is a former US Ambassador to Israel, where he served from 2001 to 2005.

He was also the US ambassador to Egypt from 1997 to 2001. He was with the US Foreign Service for 29 years, and was instrumental in shaping and implementing US policy on the peace process.

Ambassador Kurtzer is currently with Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs where he is the S. Daniel Abraham professor in Middle Eastern policy studies.

He is the author and editor of a number of books about the US role in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, including his most recent volume, for which he was editor, Pathways to Peace: America and The  Arab-Israeli Conflict .

In Pathways to Peace , Ambassador Kurtzer outlines a roadmap for a more dynamic US policy for the peace process.

Ambassador Kurtzer spoke to Empire about his experiences of the negotiations, bringing forward how not just Israel, but the Palestinians also wanted US sponsorship.

Empire can be seen from the last Sunday of every month at 2000GMT, and is re-aired during the following week at these times GMT: Monday: 1200GMT; Tuesday: 0100GMT; Wednesday: 0600GMT.


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Source:
Al Jazeera
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