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Edward Luttwak: 'Interventionist impasse'

The military strategist and scholar explains the case for intervention in Syria and the US' strategy in the Middle East.

Last Modified: 30 Sep 2013 16:31
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I’m very pleased that the interventionist impasse, this unthinking, unreasoning, unstrategical intervention impulse was stopped by a variety of things, including Putin’s offer.

Edward Luttwak, military strategist, historian and scholar

Edward Luttwak is a military strategist, historian and scholar, and is currently a senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC.

He has consulted the US department of defense, the national security council, the US state department and the US army. 

At 26, he published his first book Coup d'État: A Practical Handbook, which was translated into 14 different languages.

Luttwak has authored a number of books about strategy, including the well-known and controversial The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire (1979). His most recent book is The Rise of China vs. the Logic of Strategy (2012).

Luttwak lectures at American universities and military colleges, and is on the editorial board of the Washington Quarterly and Geopolitique (Paris).

Luttwak spoke to Empire about the case for intervention in Syria and the US' strategy in the Middle East.

 

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Al Jazeera
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