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Empire
Code Red
After 9/11, George Bush insisted freedom would be defended, but ironically freedom was the very thing that was eroded.
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2011 11:51

Producer: Flo Phillips

September 11, 2011 was a day that changed the world for almost everyone. After the attacks the White House had the world's sympathy and solidarity, but the US administration wanted revenge. Cultural fear was institutionalised, increased surveillance became commonplace as politicians waited in line to sign the Patriot Act and to create the Department of Homeland Security. Websites offered gasmasks for sale, basic human rights were cast aside, and air travel became a degrading experience.

The global 'war on terror' came at a high price and its effects could be felt across all aspects of everyday life, and ironically the one thing that was promised by the Bush administration - "Freedom will be defended" - was the one thing that was taken away.

 
9/12 and the 'war on terror' can be seen from Thursday, September 8, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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