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Empire
The new Ottomans?
One of the fastest-growing economies in the world, Turkey gazes in many directions to become the superpower it once was.
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2011 11:01

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Following another resounding electoral victory, Prime Minister Erdogan's Justice and Development Party has been emboldened to further increase Turkey's role on the world stage.  

Ankara has rediscovered its global ambitions. This emerging regional power is now the fastest-growing G20 country after China, and has risen to be the 16th largest economy in the world.

The Turkish government prides itself on promoting a foreign policy as unique as the country's geography. Straddling both East and West, it has tried to maintain good diplomatic relations with all sides. But when the European Union started moving the goalposts, Turkey began to look East.

Interview: Ahmet Davutoglu

Could this be Turkey's moment in the limelight? Or has the Arab spring taken Turkey by surprise?

And how will it balance its NATO membership when its rhetoric is not aligned? What direction will Turkey take under a dominant AK party?

Much like its symbol, the two-headed eagle, Turkey gazes in many directions. Will it pick the right path to become the super power it once was?

Empire finds out.

Joining us to discuss the issues are: Ahmet Davutoglu, the Turkish foreign minister; Professor Binnaz Toprak, member of parliament in the Turkish opposition; Suat Kiniklioglu, deputy chair, external affairs; Professor Soli Özel, international relations at Bilgi University.

Interviewees: Fadi Hakura, Turkey analyst at Chatham House; and Professor Sevket Pamuk, chair of Turkish Studies at the London School of Economics. 

Source:
Al Jazeera
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