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Local hero: Mark Covington
An urban farming pioneer brings free organic produce to his Detroit neighbourhood while bringing his community together.
Last Modified: 18 Aug 2012 07:55

In the second part of our earthrise special on urban agriculture in Detroit, Russell Beard meets Mark Covington, an urban farming pioneer and community leader who was born and raised in the city.

When he was younger Covington says his neighbourhood had everything; clothes shops, shoe shops, restaurants and a car dealership. But almost all the shops have now gone, and many people rely on liquor stores, gas stations and a few scarce grocery shops for their food. Over half a million Detroit residents live closer to convenience stores than grocers, and nearly half of the city lives below the poverty line.

Covington set up Georgia Street Community Garden to clean up his area and help his neighbours. By raising chickens and goats and growing vegetables, Covington not only provides free organic produce to his neighbourhood, he has also brought his community together and even attracted newcomers to the area.

 
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Source:
Al Jazeera
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