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earthrise

series one, episode eight

Cycling in Copenhagen, tide-powered turbine in Belfast and saving Tasmania's predator species.

Last updated: 07 Jul 2013 13:54
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On this episode of earthrise: Denmark wants to make its capital, Copenhagen, the world's best city for cycling in an attempt to curb air pollution which is a major environmental problem in urban locations around the globe. Copenhagen is building more and wider bicycle lanes and dedicated car-free river crossings.

A community in Northern Ireland is running a project to try to generate electricity by harnessing the energy of tidal flows in Strangford Lough, one of the fastest tidal areas in the world. The effort using a submerged turbine is green, clean and unlikely to harm marine life.

Australia's New South Wales has embarked on one of the most ambitious breeding programmes to save the endangered species of Tasmanian devils from a deadly contagious form of cancer. The Devil Ark project aims to establish and keep at least 1,000 devils alive while the disease runs its course in the wild.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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