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Counting the Cost
Up in the air
A special edition from the Dubai Air Show: how is the global financial crisis effecting the aviation industry?
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2011 12:17

This special edition of Counting the Cost comes to you direct from the Dubai Air Show 2011, and it is all about aviation.

$63bn was spent this year in Dubai, making the show far more successful than the last event in 2009.

But issues still plague the airline industry, most notably the price of oil which has been up above $100 a barrel for some time. The related fuel costs, and the downturn in Europe, have meant a rethink for the aviation sector as it tries to ward off the worst of the global downturn.

Some of the biggest players in the airline business tell Counting the Cost's Kamahl Santamaria how they are maintaining altitude in these economically difficult times. Guests on the show include: Tim Clark, president, Emirates Airline; Akbar al-Baker, CEO, Qatar Airways; James Albaugh, CEO, Boeing Commercial Airplanes; and Enzo Casolini, CEO, Eurofighter.

Also on the show, military aviation spending, much less fanfare than commercial airlines but far more capital spent.  
 
And the 787 dreamliner finally makes its long awaited Middle East debut.
 
 
Counting the Cost can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Friday: 2230; Saturday: 0930; Sunday: 0330; Monday: 1630.

Click here for more on Counting the Cost.
Source:
Al Jazeera
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